SaferHavant > Policing and Crime

Policing and Crime

Policing

 

Find your local ‘Safer Neighbourhoods’ team

Hampshire Constabulary’s ‘Safer Neighbourhoods’ teamsĀ  focus on problem-solving and engaging with their local community to learn more about local issues and improve quality of life for local people.

Crime and anti-social behaviour in your area

Reporting a community safety issue

Find out more about how to report a crime or a community safety issue such as an abandoned vehicle, incident of graffiti or criminal damage by following the link below:

Anti-social behaviour

Anti-social behaviour is a broad term that can include litter and flytipping, rowdy and drunken groups, noisy motorbikes and vandalism.

Alcohol

Alcohol can be a major factor in anti-social behaviour, criminal damage and nuisance and public place violent crime.

Domestic abuse

The Safer Havant Partnership is committed to reducing domestic abuse in the Havant Borough and the unacceptable harm it causes to those who suffer.

PREVENT

Prevent is the name given to a national strategy which aims to stop people from becoming violent extremists or supporting terrorism.

Local crime figures available at the touch of a button

A new interactive national map providing access to local crime statistics and neighbourhood policing details in local areas has been launched across England and Wales, allowing you to view figures for all crime (burglary, robbery, violence, vehicle crime and anti-social behaviour), in your area at the touch of a button.

You will also be able to see details of your neighbourhood police team, local policing priorities and information about forthcoming local events such as crime prevention meetings and local surgeries.

You can find general information and statistics about crime rates, health, education and jobs in your local area through the Office for National Statistics. Simply follow the link below and type in your postcode to learn more about your neighbourhood.

Community Trigger

What is a Community Trigger?

Community Trigger gives victims and communities the right to request a review of their case and bring agencies together to take a joined up, problem solving approach to find a resolution.

If Community Trigger threshold is met agencies will share information, review what action has been taken and decide if additional actions are possible.

Who can use the Community Trigger?

  • A victim of anti-social behaviour or another person acting on behalf of the victim.
  • An individual acting on behalf of a group of residents or community group.

How to activate the Community Trigger?

Community Trigger threshold:

Individual – Three complaints in the previous six months. Reporting behaviour causing harassment, alarm or distress to a member or members of the community and you think no action has been taken or are not satisfied with the action taken.

Group – Five individuals in a local community have reported separately similar incidents of anti-social behaviour to members of the Community Safety Partnership. They all think that no action has been taken or are not satisfied with the action taken. The individual acting on behalf of the group must have all other individuals consent.

To meet the criteria incidents need to:

  • Cause harassment, alarm or distress.
  • Been logged within one month of the incident.
  • Last incident has occurred within the previous six months.

Time Frame:

The Community Safety Partnership should aim to have Community Triggers dealt with within 20 working days. More complex cases may take longer, in these cases the individual or group will be notified that the deadline date will not be met.

Useful links

Hampshire Constabulary

Call on 101 or in an emergency always call 999

Find your local safer neighbourhoods team by entering your postcode on Hampshire Constabulary’s website:

Hampshire Police and Crime Commissioner

The mission of a Police and Crime Commissioner is to oversee and scrutinise policing.

Commissioners are a voice for the people, someone to lead the fight against crime, and someone to hold to account if they don’t deliver.

They will not run the police force – operational police business is a matter for the Chief Constable. But the Commissioner can and will hold the Chief Constable to account.